Gifted Child
Homeschooling a gifted child can be done. In fact, you will find that your gifted child can flourish like never before when educated at home. Here you'll find support, encouragement, ideas, and strategies for homeschooling your gifted child.
Homeschooling Your Gifted Child
The Ultimate Guide to Homeschooling Gifted Children

As more families choose to homeschool their children, parents of gifted learners and twice-exceptional children are discovering the benefits of home education. This guide discusses what is giftedness, why you should homeschool your gifted child, how to homeschool your gifted child, and offers support, information, and recommended materials. 

Gifted Kids' Bill of Rights
A list of ideals for interacting, living, and learning with a gifted child.
Should You Homeschool Your Gifted Child?

Homeschooling your gifted child gives you the ability to discover what interests him or her and meet those interests in the best way possible. You can incorporate alternative learning strategies, movement, field trips and other real-life learning, and diverse social groups to meet the needs of your homeschooled gifted child. 

Testing and Assessment: What Do the Tests Tell Us?
Many parents arrive in the world of gifted education with a report full of tests results, supposedly defining their child as "gifted." But more often than not, parents have more questions than answers upon receiving those test results. And just as often, the short answers from the psychologist, the school, the teachers, and other parents do more to confuse than clarify.
Support for Homeschooling Parents of Gifted Children
GHF Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

The mission of the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum is to empower every gifted family to make strategic, proactive, and intentional educational choices. This community started out of the need to create learning environments for gifted children to thrive. Going strong for over 15 years, this community offers sharing of resources, information, and support. 

7 Simple Strategies to Homeschool Gifted Kids Well

Yes, homeschooling a gifted child is possible! Homeschooling gives you the opportunity to meet unique needs perfectly. This article talks about how to keep up with a child who devours curriculum, how to encourage depth and breadth in learning, and how to get help and support in your homeschooling gifted journey. 

Resources for the Gifted Child
Homeschooling and Libraries: New Solutions and Opportunities

Homeschools are alwsy looking for alternative ways of schooling that do not necessarily reflect what a typical classroom looks like. Since homeschooling is so diverse across families, information institutions, including public, academic, school, and special libraries may find it challenging to meet all their needs and desires. This collection of essays offers approaches and strategies from library professionals and veteran homeschoolers on how to best serve the needs and experiences of homeschooled youth. This book includes information on special needs homeschooling, gifted students, and African American students as well.

In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child's Multiple Intelligences
Children learn in differing ways. Thomas Armstrong specializes in helping parents identify the unique areas in each of our children that enhance their special way of learning and expressing creativity. This work on multiple intelligences talks about the eight different kinds of multiple intelligences, showing you how to discover your child's particular areas of strength. 
Bright Kids at Home
This is a place for families who want to homeschool for academic reasons or who are already homeschooling gifted and talented students. Here you will find ideas about how you might homeschool your gifted student.
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Featured Resources

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I Learn Better by Teaching Myself/Still Teaching Ourselves
Take a look at how a homeschooling mother learned to trust her children-and herself-to learn in new ways. Tag along on the journey from the elementary years through high school as this book explore the success and freedom of unstructured learning. These books are especially good for anyone wrestling with the question of "how much structure should there be in a homeschool?"
English from the Roots Up
English from the Roots Up explores the Latin and Greek roots of words. Many people haven't realized how valuable the Latin and Greek vocabulary is in the formulation of the finely structured English vocabulary of today. Even learning a few Latin and Greek root words gets you hooked and you want to learn more. Why? Because you can move from "what words mean" to "why words mean"&mdashin short, a thinking vocabulary. You'll find product information here.
Home Organizing Workbook: Clearing Your Clutter, Step-By-Step
Failing the Mary Poppins' snap-the-fingers approach to cleaning, here's the next best thing: an utterly practical handbook that offers lasting results for anyone looking to banish clutter from every room in the house. Home organizer par excellence Meryl Starr offers up her hardworking organizing solutions in The Home Organizing Workbook, a straightforward guide to getting organized. The room chapters begin with targeted questionnaires that help the reader identify specific organizational problem...
Homeschooling: A Patchwork of Days: Share a Day With 30 Homeschooling Families
From a bedroom community in Nebraska to a farm in Vermont, from families who rely on workbooks to those who have sworn them off, this in-depth examination of the lives of homeschoolers covers a wide range of people and methods. When author Nancy Lande started homeschooling more than 10 years ago, this is the book she wanted that didn't exist. What better way to create your homeschool than reading about others and picking and choosing the styles that appeal to you? Lande has corralled a variety o...
Easy Grammar Systems
Easy Grammar Systems publishes the Easy Grammar and Daily Grams teaching texts for use through high school. Students use a “hands on” approach (deleting/marking) and learn correct usage and why that usage is appropriate. Review and using information previously learned to teach new concepts help to insure mastery learning. This method is both easy to teach and easy to learn.